Old Town Community Council profile – produced by City of Edinburgh Council’s planning department. Statistics based on UK Census of 27th March 2011.

This page summarises information published by the City of Edinburgh Council’s planning and building standards department in January 2014. “Community Councils Area Profiles” summarises the 2011 Census with respect to people living within the boundaries of Old Town Community Council. The data is from the Census of the UK Population, undertaken in 2011. The next Census takes place in 2021. Of the 6,976 data zones across Scotland, 62 are specific to Old Town Community Council. They are all listed here. The following screenshots are taken from “Community Councils Area Profiles” and the analysis is based on information in the document.
Table 1 : key statistics
In 2011, there was an average of 23 people living in each hectare of the areas represented by Old Town Community Council. Therefore, our population density was closest to the areas represented by Community Councils in Corstorphine (21), Silverknowes (22), Longstone (24) and Murrayfield (24). As shown in the map at the top of this page, approximately half of the space in Old Town is non-residential. There are many
  • public buildings: Palace of Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh Castle, National Museums of Scotland, National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh Central Library, University of Edinburgh, Kirks, High Court)
  • Edinburgh Waverley
  • Parks : Princes Street Gardens, Holyrood Park
  • Souvenir shops
  • Pubs
  • and more !
Old Town’s population density in Old Town was considerably less than in the areas represented by our neighbouring Community Councils in New Town & Broughton (65), Southside (130), Toll Cross (82), West End (51). Southside’s population density was the second highest in Edinburgh, after Leith Central (136).
Table 2 : age structure
In 2011, there were 7,875 people living in the areas represented by Old Town Community Council. Our population was closest in size, to the areas represented by Community Councils representing Sighthill, Broomhouse & Parkhead (7,568), Hutchison & Chesser (7,702), Firrhill (7,716), Trinity (8,721) and Craigleith & Blackhall (8,920). Old Town’s population was considerably less, than in the areas represented by our neighbouring Community Councils in New Town and Broughton (18,136), Southside (13,148), Toll Cross (10,859), West End (5,810). The three Community Councils with the highest populations in Edinburgh were Leith Central (25,099), Corstorphine (23,387) and Gilmerton & Inch (20,319).
Table 3 : household composition
More than half of households (53.5%) in areas represented by Old Town Community Council, were occupied by one person. Gorgie & Dalry (54.7%) was Edinburgh’s area with the highest proportion of single-occupancy households and Old Town came second. Leith Central (49%), Leith Harbour & Newhaven (48.3%) and Stockbridge & Inverleith (48.2%) were third, fourth and fifth. The number of people living alone in Old Town (53.5%) was considerably greater than in the areas represented by our neighbouring Community Councils in New Town & Broughton (44.8%), Southside (43.4%), Toll Cross (47.5%), West End (43.9%).
Table 4 : household tenure
There were 3,858 households in the areas represented by Old Town Community Council in 2011. This was closest to the areas represented by Community Councils representing Craigleith & Blackhall (3,827), Hutchison & Chesser (3,888), Trinity (3,955) and Queensferry & District (3,974). Old Town’s household number was considerably less than in the areas represented by our neighbouring Community Councils in New Town & Broughton (9,488), Southside (5,238), Toll Cross (4,853), West End (2,958). Edinburghs three Community Councils with the highest populations were Leith Central (14,020), Corstorphine (10,334) and New Town & Broughton (9,488).
Table 5 : household size by number of rooms
Table 6 : household size by number or residents
At 5.7%, the areas represented by Old Town Community Council had the highest proportion of overcrowded homes in 2011. Southside (4.6%) and Toll Cross (4.3%) were second and third. Old Town’s overcrowding compared to the areas represented by our neighbouring Community Councils was as follows: New Town & Broughton (2.5%), Southside (4.6%), Toll Cross (4.3%), West End (1.7%). Figures for overcrowded household spaces and under-occupied household spaces in Table 6, relate to households with an occupancy rating of -2 or less and +2 or more respectively. Occupancy rating is a figure derived for the number of rooms a household needs based upon the ages, genders and relationships of the residents. +2 means a household has 2 or more rooms than it requires. -2 means that a household has at least 2 rooms less than it requires.
Table 7 : car availability
People living in the areas represented by Old Town Community Council in 2011 had the third lowest number of cars in Edinburgh (1,419). This was above the areas with the two lowest number of cars – Muirhouse & Salvesen (1,198) and Drylaw & Telford (1,406). The three Community Councils with the highest numbers of cars in Edinburgh were Corstorphine (11,191), Leith Central (7,298) and Gilmerton & Inch (7,242). Old Town’s car-ownership compared to the areas represented by our neighbouring Community Councils as follows: New Town & Broughton (6,766), Southside (1,898), Toll Cross (2005) and West End (2,357).
Table 8 : transport to work
For figures in Table 8, the percentage figure calculation excludes those working from home. Train travel includes train, light rail, underground and tram travel.
Table 9 : dwellings
Dwellings in Table 9 are defined as a physical buildings or parts of a building such as a house, bungalow or flat. A household space relates to the part of a dwelling occupied by a single household (i.e. a small number of dwellings are shared between households). 96% of all dwellings were tenements/flats, in the areas represented by Old Town Community Council, Gorgie & Dalry, Toll Cross and Southside. Old Town’s 96% of tenements/flats compared with our neighbouring Community Councils as follows: New Town & Broughton (90%), Southside (96%), Toll Cross (96%), West End (88%).
Table 10 : ethnic composition and religion
Table 11 : socio-economic classification
The classifications used are the standard National Statistics Socio Economic Classifications (NS-Sec).
Table 12 : economic activity
Figure 13 : country of birth
Table 14 : health / limiting condition
Table 15 : industry of employment
Classifications are based upon the Standard Industry Classification of employer (SIC). Primary Industries include the divisions; ‘Agriculture forestry and fishing’, ‘Mining and quarrying’, ‘Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply’ and ‘Water supply, sewerage, waste management and remediation activities’. Finance/business services includes the divisions; ‘Financial and insurance activities’, ‘Real estate activities’, ‘Profession, scientific and technical activities’ and ‘Administrative and support service activities’.
Table 16 : national identity
‘Other UK identities’ includes any combination of UK identities specified that are not covered by the preceding categories.
Table 17 : qualifications
Table 18 : occupation
Information from the 1991, 2001 and 2011 census of the population of the UK is available here.
%d bloggers like this: